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Tropical Fruit Trees

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While researching persimmons (after reading Broden's thread on Texas persimmons) that might grow in the tropics...I came across this website. It isn't complete (it only shows one variety of banana for instance), but I thought it gives a pretty good starting  point...

 

http://www.caldwellhort.com/html/tropical-fruit.html

 

I would like to see a more complete selection of fruit trees, bushes and vines that will grow in the Tropics, so if you know of others (and there are plenty), please feel free to post them here. Once my pool is finished next year, we will be planting trees, bushes and vines around the yard, and I would like them to be fruit-bearing for the most part. BTW, persimmons grow in Vietnam, so I see no reason why they wouldn't grow here.

 

Please feel free to post your favorite tropical fruits here, along with pictures, descriptions and any information on where they may be found (if you know). I know the nursery at the Department of Agriculture site in Mandaue (across from Pacific Mall) has a great selection, but I also know some of the commercial nurseries on Cebu have varieties the DoA nursery doesn't have.

 

PS...I realize this site is a commercial site (they sell trees) for one of James' former competitors in Houston, but what I liked was the variety of fruits shown.

 

PSS...Tim, when you get a permanent place to live down in the Houston area, you should pay these folks a visit. You were asking how to help your wife get over home-sickness. Well, having tropical fruit trees in your yard (so she can still have the taste of home readily available) would go a long way.

Edited by Headshot
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This little book has proved useful to me.

 

It includes the names of fruit trees in Filipino and other regional languages as well as very good photos and nutritional information.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Pocket-Tropical-Fruits-Periplus-Nature/dp/079460188X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1378095404&sr=8-1&keywords=periplus+tropical+fruitpost-5791-0-34538800-1378095547_thumb.jpg

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We harvested from eight cashew trees. Got about 4 buckets. Fruit was a bit pungent. Smelt a bit like Durian but I thought it might make good juice. Anyway it tuned out they are full of a caustic liquid and must be cleaned wearing industrial gloves. No wonder they are so expensive. We never bothered with ours.

 

Lol Spell checker keeps substituting durian for Syrian!

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Great topic.

 

The santol (sometimes called wild mangosteen) tree is a good candidate for a fruiting shade tree although they can get very large.

 

The fruit is quite sour by itself but makes excellent preserves.

 

 

 


post-5791-0-66187500-1378097466_thumb.jpgpost-5791-0-74938100-1378098039_thumb.jpg

 

post-5791-0-04206900-1378098075_thumb.png

Edited by BossHog
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Great topic.

 

The santol (sometimes called wild mangosteen) tree is a good candidate for a fruiting shade tree although they can get very large.

 

The fruit is quite sour by itself but makes excellent preserves.

 

I already have a mango tree growing in our yard, and we will probably have mangosteen, banana, papaya and lanzones, but I am trying to expand my knowledge. The funny thing is that we have a volunteer santol tree growing where our driveway will be, but it will be removed. I have also thought or having cacao (where chocolate comes from), but I don't know enough about them yet to decide for sure. It appears that that the tropical persimmon is related to the black persimmon that Broden was talking about. They are everbearing, which means you would have ripe fruit year-round. I will also have at least one malunggay tree (I know...it isn't a fruit tree, but we eat it a lot in soups). As for what other fruits we will have in our yard...I just haven't decided yet. I won't have any heavy fruits (coconuts, durian, jackfruit) because I don't want to deal with them and the consequences of fruit falling on somebody.

Edited by Headshot

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Don't forget the humble guava tree.

 

We have a few dozen and they grow well without much care/fertilization.

 

Only one is of the pink flesh/aromatic variety, the others have the more pedestrian greenish-white flesh but still good eating.

 

They bear a lot of fruit which is easy, fun, and harmless to harvest.

 

The foliage isn't very dense but the size is just right for a backyard pool area.

 

Like most fruit we grow it always seems to be eaten before it's ripe.lol

 

Don't know if you have many fruit bats where you are but we lose a lot of fruit to those things.post-5791-0-45029500-1378100998_thumb.jpg

post-5791-0-91251000-1378101240_thumb.jpg

Edited by BossHog
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Nice post Headshot - an excellent resource can be found at The Ramon Aboitiz Foundation Inc (RAFI), heavily involved in the National Greening Programme. http://rafi.org.ph/greenin-philippines/green-almanac/  here you will find an extensive list of Philippine endemic trees,including fruiting ones. Quite recently they published a very nice hardback book entitled 'Native Trees in the Visayas' a bit costly at P2,500. The book is available from RAFI headquarters located not far from the Cebu monument in L. Jaena street.

 

Another excellent resource is a book entitled 'Philippine Native Trees 101' available from 'Fully Booked' in Ayala. Priced at P1,200 I found it of more use as not only does it give an excellent description of trees but also gives details on fruiting trees that birds are attracted to. That happens to be my interest - as a bird photographer the fruiting trees they visit are so essential to their existence. So even if you could include a small percentage of trees they favour then well done Headshot :-)

 

To obtain seedlings you could try the RAFI nursery which is located on the left hand side as you head up Busay, about 1km before Tops there is a sharp left hand turning which takes you up a steep roadway.You pass a massive building on the right which is under construction , the nursery being on the left hand side another 1km along the track. Saplings are priced at p25 each.

 

Good luck with your project....

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to fill in smaller areas with sun you might like to consider some calamansi trees.  mango is my favorite tree but it needs plenty of room.  ours are just outside our walls and fence.  we have an avocado tree along our fence.  the maid harvests quite a bit from it and sells it to neighbors.  lots of guacamole in the house during season.  i hate avocado myself.  we had a jackfruit tree that did quite well with fruit (but i'm told the tree itself can be a bit tricky to grow) until a painter decided it was a good place to dump his used varnish remover.   we always had some jackfruit in the freezer.  papaya can be put most anywhere.  we have papaya and mangosteen along one of the fences.  guava grows nicely, we have some of those in the open lot next door.

 

regarding your pool, take care what you plant nearby.  some fruit trees attract flies and that could be a nuisance when you are trying to chill out.

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Rambutan can easily be grown from seed, but best to buy a grafted sapling, Takes five years to be fruit bearng, Grows compact but tall.

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