David_LivinginTalisay

Living (& working) in China!

269 posts in this topic

I would like to know more about your life in China....

 

The people

 

Day to day life

 

The government restrictions ,,,if any.

 

Entertainment

 

Food talk is always good.

 

Maybe some politics............

 

...........just sayin.

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Buses are the cheapest way to get to and from Hong Kong International Airport, and the "A" routes are the most comfortable among all airport bus routes.

 

The New Territories are serviced by 5 Airbus routes (A31/A33/A41/A41P/A43).

 

The Airbus A43 plies between the airport and Fanling. The route is serviced by double-decked buses with air-conditioning. The luggage racks allow to store your luggage while you enjoy a bus ride. The bus stop (Ground Transportation Centre) is situated outside the Arrival Hall on the right side. So, to take a bus from the airport you need to get out of the Arrival Hall and turn right. Follow the direction signs.

 

This route is used by many people as a way to get to and from Shenzhen (Luohu or Futian)

The scheme from Hong Kong International Airport to Shenzhen: Airport(HKIA) ›› Airport Bus A43 (get off at stop #3. Sheung Shui Railway Station) ›› Shueng Shui MTR Station ›› Lo Wu or Lok Ma Chau MTR Stations ›› Shenzhen.

Backward: Shenzhen (Luohu or Futian) ›› Lo Wu or Lok Ma Chau MTR Stations ›› Shueng Shui MTR Station ›› Airport Bus A43 (get on at stop #13. Sheung Shui Railway Station) ›› Airport(HKIA).

 

The Route and Timetable

The Airbus route A43 serves Fanling area (North District, the New Territories). The journey distance between the airport and Luen Wo Hui Bus Terminus is about 60 km.

The approximate journey time is 80 mins and varies according to the traffic conditions.

 

The route from the airport runs along San Wan Road, Pak Wo Road, Jockey Club Road, Sha Tau Kok Road to Luen Wo Hui Bus Terminus, and covers the following areas: Sheung Shui and Fanling. The buses run daily from 7:00am to 12:00am with a frequency every 15-30 minutes.

 

The return route is almost the same and the buses run daily from 5:20am to 10:30pm with a frequency every 15-30 minutes.

 

The Fare and Payment Methods

The adult fare is HK$30.9 and there are several ways to pay for a ride:

- Buy a single journey ticket. It can be purchased at Customer Service & Airbus Ticket Office (Airport Ground Transportation Centre).

- Pay by cash. You must pay the exact amount of HK$ for a ride because the bus driver will not give you a change.

- Pay by Octopus Card. It can be purchased at the Arrival Hall.

 

The Bus Stops of A43 Route

Airport ›› Luen Wo Hui B/T Luen Wo Hui B/T ›› Airport

 

# Bus Stop # Bus Stop

1 Airport (Ground Transportation Centre) 1 Luen Wo Hui Bus Terminus

2 Lantau Link Toll Plaza 2 Lok Wo Street

3 Sheung Shui Station 3 Fanling Fire Station.

 

Hints & Tips

- One piece of luggage and one piece of hand luggage is allowed to carry free of charge for each passenger.

 

 

 

 

Hopefully, Ana-Katrina (Sha-Sha's daughter), will have her day offon that Saturday and can meet me for lunch (bringing a rucksack that I left @ the apartment of my Brother-in-Law, LEE. Sai Yun (Simon).

 

I am not sure if I have time to divert to WanChai and collect myself?

 

I need to collect my Train Ticket fromn SchenZhen North Station by say 3pm for my 4pm train (as they recommend at least 1 hour prior to departure to be safe, due to potential long lines of customers.). I know from experience it took more than 20 min from arrival @ Changsha South Station, (and missed my train as a consequence).

 

Hope this helps with ways to fly in/out HongKong and Cross Border into Guangdong Province of China.

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I find taking the HKIA to Shekou ferry more convinient for me, it costs a little more @ HK$120 one way. They deliver your checked in luggage (1 piece free) to the wharf in Shekou no need to collect it at the airport.

Edited by Highlighter

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I would like to know more about your life in China....

 

The people

 

Day to day life

 

The government restrictions ,,,if any.

 

Entertainment

 

Food talk is always good.

 

Maybe some politics............

 

...........just sayin.

To get answers and information to many of these Questions, you should find ,What's New In Changsha?', very informative.

 

http://www.wnichangsha.com/

 

https://facebook.com/WhatsNewInChangsha/

 

Created by this British guy, by the name of Damion Braithwaite.

 

He is also an English Teacher, an IELTS Examiner and Business man (is married to Chinese and have young child).

 

Damion encouraged me to have a go @creating Hunan Hash House Harriers as the GM (Grand Master), as I seem to have been the only Foreigner in Changsha to know what it is all about let alone dine over 200 Hash Runs. (including one with BCN Hash in.Catolonia, Spain. with my son Paul).

 

It was only myself (Mr.Fart) and Sha-Sha (Brill Pad) that attended HN H3 Run #003) in 2015. Thia was Joining in CS H3 (ChangSha, Hash House Harriers).

 

DoubleO Dirk (Ex GM of Guangzhou) Hash, and Monkey (Ex

GM of CS Hash) have helped the growth of other Hashers joining in and helping Train Virgin Hashers how to Set Trails.

 

It is to be HN Hash Run# 013 this coming Sunday.

 

There are at least 25 x HashHouse Kennels in Mainland China.

 

The China National Hash is in Chengdu later this year.

 

Changsha, being the Capital if Hunan Province, has more entertainment and more Foreigners than I came across in Zhuzhou not far to the South (half hour or so Bus Ride or 7 minutes for 1 stop on High Speed Train!

 

 

MianYang was.also a lot quieter, than ChengDu. the Capital of Sitchuan Province. I did not really spend much time for Socialising. There are certainly less Foreigners in Chengdu than Changsha. So Changsha probably has much better Social Life.

 

I am sure there are more Citues in China wth a lot more Foreigners living. working and having FUN than in Changsha.

 

Shanghai & Beijing will undoubtedly have more Foreigners. living there and earning more money too. But the COST of Liiving (and potential illness). is a lot higher also (Check Air Quality Index Figures).

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay
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I would like to know more about your life in China....

 

The people

 

Day to day life

 

The government restrictions ,,,if any.

 

Entertainment

 

Food talk is always good.

 

Maybe some politics............

 

...........just sayin.

Maybe I can help

 

The people...................... Most Chinese are very friendly, like to talk to foreigners, they can show great respect you foreign visitors, but while that is very pleasant, the opposite happens when travelling, where they would push a crippled 90 year old over to get a seat on a train/bus etc. Disgraceful behavior in Airports, bus and train stations.

It's all a lack of social skills and poor organisation by transport companies, the lack of social skills crops up every day, one just has to put up with it, although I do sometimes take a student aside and explain that spitting etc is not something to be done in public.

On the whole, outside of the big Cities Beijing, Shanghai, etc the people are kind and generous. Non-violent and have a similar disposition to the better educated people of the Philippines, but with somewhat old fashioned attitudes and traditions.

 

Day to day life......................Much like in the west to be honest, although with some differences, they work very long hours, shops open early and close late, weekends are often just another working day.

The night life, away from the biggest cities, is nonexistent, most places closed by 9 pm, KTVs are very popular, and stay open later, some are converted tea houses and somewhat sleazy to me, others are purpose-built and use high-tech music systems, very popular with the younger members of society. Holiday time is reserved for lazing around, watching TV, eating and sleeping, getting more popular, is visiting scenic areas, such as the Great wall, Beijing, the religious mountains and lakes or even going to the coast. The concept of leisure activities, such as motor sport, boating etc. has yet to emerge in China.

The rise of motor vehicles has created a problem, most Chinese have no road sense whatsoever and poor laws can cause complications, a driver is always at fault and has to pay for medical treatment, even if a drunk guy steps out in front of a car, its the driver who pays. China has an enormous number of e-bikes, these are electric scooters, they are quite large, fast and silent, no license is required, so they cause a lot of problems on the roads.   To me, driving in Phils is safer and easier than in China, which may give you an idea just how bad it is there.

 

Government restrictions...................Exist, but in over 8 years of living in China, in various cities, I cannot think of one occasion where any of the restrictions has caused a big problem, in fact, I believe I have more freedom in China than I had living in the UK. Certain subjects are frowned upon withing classrooms, Tibet, Taiwan for example, and now it could be a serious punishment (deported) if a (any) teacher discusses Hong Kong and becoming independent, the central ruling party being very  very fearful that if HK breaks away, it would start other provinces/autonomous zones doing the same, rather like the EU and the UK breaking away, but with a greater chance of it happening in China.

 

Entertainment....................As I wrote above, the biggest entertainment is KTV, followed by watching sport on TV, Basketball is huge, snooker is a growing activity as is football, and recently certain Universities are teaching Rugby, with a view to create a Chinese team for the next Olympics.

Otherwise the smartphone seems to rule the entire population.

 

 

Food............. some good, some awful, and everything in between, remember, Chinese food eaten outside of mainland China is usually based on the Hong Kong style, which is very different to the style used in mainland China, each province and each city within that province, have their own special ways to prepare and cook food, some places like incredibly hot spicy food such as Sichuan province, others prefer soups which to me is like water and tasteless.  Chicken and pork are the main meats and rice/ noodles the stable diet, northern Chinese prefer Noodles, Rice for those from the south. Fruit is easy to get and a huge variety, sadly many of the fruits we like as westerners such as oranges, grapes, are dry and not juicy, although you can get imported fruit which is often better than local produce. Bananas usually come from The Philippines!!!  But there are some really delicious fruits which are not available in the west.

 

 

Politics.........................  Controversial subject lol. China is ruled by the CPC, which, while retaining the name Communist, actually pushes the idea of socialism, in fact the leaders say their type of politics is classified as socialistic not communistic, owning property is encouraged, as is entrepreneurialism.

Like most political areas, some is good and a lot is bad.

 

 

China is vastly misjudged, the media has its own agenda and so revel in bad news stories, most of which are hugely exaggerated. In my experience, most westerners who visit China, leave with a very different view from that which they had originally. And many return as they enjoyed themselves so much before. China is an amazing country and very beautiful in places, yes it has pollution, but also areas of natural beauty which are well looked after and preserved to ensure they do not suffer from pollution. As the older generation fades away, the younger generations understand better how to conserve and not litter everywhere. it just takes time to change.

 

 

A very brief description, so if you have any questions, I will do my best to answer them.

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\ owning property is encouraged, as is entrepreneurialism.

Like most political areas, some is good and a lot is bad.

 

 

 

 

Owning the land is not possible.  Chinese people have to lease land from the government:

 

 

Like every other homeowner in China, Mr. Chen and his neighbor own their homes but not the land underneath them. All land in China is owned by the government, which parcels it out to developers and homeowners through 20- to 70-year leases.

When the neighbor — whose surname is Wang — tried to sell her apartment, local officials told her that her lease on the land had expired. To sell her apartment, they told her, she would have to pay them one-third of the sales value.

Ms. Wang protested in a move that drew national attention. Suddenly millions of Chinese who had socked away billions — and possibly trillions — of dollars were worried as well. If the local authorities in other parts of China did the same thing, they thought, a big chunk of their own wealth could end up with the government as well.

Continue reading the main story
 

“What will happen after our land lease expires?” asked Mr. Chen, 69, who with his wife holds a 70-year lease. “I will be dead when the lease expires, but will I be able to give it to my son?”

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/01/business/international/in-china-homeowners-find-themselves-in-a-land-of-doubt.html

 

 

 

Edited by Don.

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Owning the land is not possible.  Chinese people have to lease land from the government:

 

 

 

As I said, owning property is encouraged, in fact a special government payment is given to those who have worked for 25 years in certain areas, such  as education, which is used as a deposit on buying a house. (Not available to foreign workers).

 

The land lease is a different area, and in fairness, the central government has realised this situation is a major problem and they are trying to sort it out. , but like all governments, they are dragging their feet. The situation in WenZhou is being dealt with and it looks like an automatic renewal of the lease will be forthcoming.

 

The same situation occurs in the UK, where a land lease, usually for 99 years, can be very expensive to renew and often creates problems trying to get a mortgage on property with a lease expiring in less than 20 years.

 

From the New York Times  December 2016

"Chinese officials said that a group of homeowners in Wenzhou, an eastern city, would not have to pay a fee to extend the rights to the land under their residences. Homeowners in China own their dwellings but not the land under them. All land in China is owned by the government, which parcels it out to developers and homeowners through 20- to 70-year leases."

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Some more info regarding the ownership of land, which may make things clearer.

 

"The People’s Republic of China practices socialist public ownership of all land – that means the land belongs to entire population of China, with the state council managing that ownership on behalf of the people. Consequently, no person, body or organization has the right to buy, sell or transfer ownership of land. Instead, they can pay land usage rights for an agreed-upon, but limited, period.

These land usage rights can be legally transferred, traded, rented, given, exchanged, inherited, pledged or invested as though the land were owned by the occupier, but the true ownership of the land remains in the control of the government. 

As regulated in Chinese property law, foreigners, legal person of foreign capital enterprises, or sino-foreign joint venture organizations are entitled to the same rights as Chinese citizens or enterprises concerning property ownership and management. That means that foreigners can pay to obtain the right to use a piece of land, and build houses or non-residential buildings on that land, just like Chinese citizens. 

If nobody currently has the rights to use an area of land, an application must be submitted to the local Bureau of Land and Resources – though consultation with lawyers or real estate agents first is often a good idea."

 

From the CPC website

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My current Contract (5th in total) is with Hunan University.

 

This might turn out to be my last Contract (unless HNU want to retain me AND willing to extend my Contract before 1st April).

 

This explains that there is to be a new. simplified. VISA that combines Z VISA & Foreign Expert Cetificate (FEC). A Pilot Study in 10 Provinces started last October and concludes in March.

 

It seems all new Foreign Teacher applications from 1st April, will be using this New Category 'B' Visa.

 

But It will be more difficult, for those over the age of 60. I will be age 62 in April.

 

 

http://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/G40RcRn1DfdzoeOc4wsfKw

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay

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