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DepEd to use mother tongue-based language in school


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#21 M.Baboy

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 8:13 AM

My Mom, she says to me, you never asked me to teach you tagalog. Then, she tells me everyone speaks english in America anyway, theres no need for you to learn it. Of course, then I am at a severe advantage when I go to the Philippines, because some of my relatives there do not speak english that well and are ashamed to speak english to me. And, I see american mormon missionarys in Bacolod who are fluent in Tagalog and they did not grow up in the PI.




#22 Headshot

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 8:41 AM

I have told the story of going with my wife to work and they had 35-50 applicants. All college graduates. At the end of the day less than 10 were hired. And the major filter? English. Most could not speak English. They spoke the broken English that was taught to their teacher, etc. It was bad. Again, look at the job boards here in the RP. Virtually all of the jobs REQUIRES English. However, many of these jobs remain open for weeks.


And THIS action by DepEd will decrease that number even more. When I say a fairly high percentage speaks English, I should qualify that they speak and understand English at a basic level. When it comes to written English, Filipinos are better. However, Filipinos tend to shy away from things they aren't comfortable at, so many avoid speaking in English when they know their lack of understanding and improper pronunciation will be criticized. How much worse will it be with even less emphasis being given to the language?

You know, in the last century, the powerful families in Manila fought against English being taught in those areas that didn’t speak Tagalog. Their rationale (used in published arguments at the time) was that if all of the people in the Philippines became educated, they (the powerful families) wouldn’t be able to find “suitable” servants. They wanted to keep those from the other language groups relatively uneducated, so they would have no alternative but to work for them at low wages. Those families are now firmly in charge of the Philippines. I don’t think anybody should count on them having the best interests of the majority of people’s best interests at heart. They have shown time after time that they are just in it for themselves, and that they do not care about the welfare of the nation or its people.

Edited by Headshot, 28 March 2012 - 11:15 AM .


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#23 Cary

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 9:01 AM

And THIS action by DepEd will decrease that number even more. When I say a fairly high percentage speaks English, I should qualify that they speak and understand English at a basic level. When it comes to written English, Filipinos are better. However, Filipinos tend to shy away from things they aren't comfortable at, so many avoid speaking in English when they know their lack of understanding and improper pronunciation will be criticized. How much worse will it be with even less emphasis being given to the language?


Exactly.

And I say this with sadness, I really do.

#24 sandwindstars

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 9:14 AM

From what I understand of the above, Tagalog and English are not being replaced but a more user friendly language as a method of instruction to teach grade schools. Tagalog and English remain in the curriculum. They will still have to learn Tagalog only as a subject not as the medium of instruction, English remains a subject. I think it's an excellent idea. Students will still learn English in a more direct way from their mother tongue to English.

Edited by sandwindstars, 28 March 2012 - 9:41 AM .


#25 rainymike

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:59 AM

As a former educator, I think it's best to let the community dictate its curriculum - whether I like it or not. That kind of community ownership is important.

However, when I was an administrator, I used to throw up my hands when faculty changed the curriculum endlessly to solve any number of 'literacy' problems. After about a decade, we sometimes ended up with the same curriculum we started with - with little improvement in student performance. It was my opinion then and now, that the problem was not the curriculum but how teachers taught the curriculum.

I also went through politcal hot potatoes a couple of times over the 'language' issue. My observation was that when the community really got involved then it seemed to make a difference. Whether or not the language was the root of the problem, community and parental engagement in education was what made a big difference. I just hope the leaders understand this. Just changing curricula may not produce results. Getting parents, teacher, and the community actively involved and engaged in education seem to produce results.

Upshot for me, it's their call and I'm the one who will have to adapt and still be engaged.

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#26 Cary

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 11:04 AM

Getting parents, teacher, and the community actively involved and engaged in education seem to produce results.


Correct Mike.

#27 SkyMan

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 8:57 PM

By application: The RP has set itelf up as an outsource hub. Thats fine. But in the outsource market the #1 language is English. The #1 selling asset of the RP is their English skill set, not offering the cheapest price. But over the decades the RP has let this slide and now students are being taught garbled 4th, 5th generation English by their teachers who were taught the same. As a result I point you guys to the jobs boards, they require English or the applicant does not get hired. He may be qualified but if his English is not up to par, they will hire someone else or go to another country. Why is this? The outsource market is not targeted at the RP, its targeted towards the West: US, UK, Oz. As a result, this will feed into the vicious cycle of 30+ unemployment here in the RP. As already pointed out by someone else, the teachers naturally reinforce in their native tongue anyway. That's natural. But why enforce it? Rather, stress proper English. To me this will handicap the RP further. I really believe that.

There's a flaw in your logic Cary. If they had the qualifications for the job AND had better English, they would likely go OFW so now you have a bunch of applicants with the, perhaps, primary qualification of better English but not the skills. Better English would not necessarily solve the unemployment problems.

One thing that certainly would help the school problem though and allow much more time for students to get better language skills is if all of the allotted school time was actually spent studying the subjects. An amazing amount of school time is actually spent dancing around with a palstic doll in costumes that are anything but historically accurate and making a lot of noise. Do that after school if you want but not during school hours.

I think learning, actually learning, the local language is a good thing. In my study of Cebuano I have learned things about the culture itself, partly with asides from the teachers and partly just from how the language is. Culture can drive the grammar. I also have learned a lot about why those with less than perfect English make the mistakes they do. Often, if you hear an English mistake, simply translate the English words to Cebuano and you'll have the correct Cebuano grammar. Language is a major part of culture which can be part of the tourism draw. From early on the students should learn their own language, English should be required, and Tagolog optional. Any math and science should be taught in English, and the rest on the local language.

#28 tom_shor

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 9:22 PM

One problem I see is that most of the local languages are as spoken languages which means primarily that formal grammar and texts do not exist for them. I just wonder how that will work.

Edited by tom_shor, 28 March 2012 - 9:23 PM .





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