Jump to content

Comfy Theme© by Fisana
 



Photo

New Generation of Chinese Motorcyles


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
145 replies to this topic

#91 David_LivinginTalisay

David_LivinginTalisay
  • Elite Member
  • 4,941 posts
  • 1257 thanks
  • 481 topics
  • Local time: 08:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Talisay City, Cebu
  • My Blood Type:O+
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 04 November 2010 - 08:06 PM

Posted Image CHINA JIALING INDUSTRIAL CO.,LTD(GROUP)


Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

JH600B

Product Description:

Posted Image



Posted Image


http://www.advrider....ad.php?t=306481

The new Chinese sidecarI'm living right now in HK for a couple years, and I'm planning this fall to ride the Silk road in China with my wife, trip organized by the BMW HK club. A sidecar would be a good way to enjoy this adventure, but mine is in the US. One of a member of this club (Franki, he is on ADV also) told me that Jialing is manufacturing a sidecar (JH600BJ) for the Chinese army, 13000 are on order, and the compagny just finished a couple month ago to produce the first 1000 units. I was told that only a handful were sold to civilian.
After a Google surch I did not found many specifications about this rig, but the 2 wheels 600 Jialing's ones are already known.

http://www.latimes.c....ck=1&cset=true

Any way, I have found a couple pictures on Google and wanted to share them with you, what do you think!!.

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

Jialing JH600B home pageThere's a full page for the 600B here:

http://www.jialing.c...web/600_yd.html

The civilian version looks like this:


Posted Image

and apparently sells for about $4200 USD in China.

The same bike is being sold in France as the 'Rocaine' and apparently meets all Euro3 pollution-control requirements.

Looking at the various pages, I'd guess that it's a pretty direct derivitive of the Aprilia Pegaso/Cube line, since it retains Aprilia's high-mounted gas 'tank' as opposed to BMW's in-frame fuel cell, and uses a licensed version of Mikuni's DP fuel-injection instead of Bosch.

I'm pretty happy to see the sidecar outfit, as we're been stupidly pleased with Katherine's F650/Ural outfit, which has proven itself to be both a durable and practical daily commuter, and to be capable of running with the Urals until the conditions get more pukey than I'd like to ride in:


If this rig could be imported and sold for under 8 Kilobucks, I think that it would be a commercially viable product - there's an untapped market for what sidecars really shine at, as urban transport modules - neatly slotting between a car and a scooter for utility and fun.

Cheers

Jim

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay, 04 November 2010 - 08:15 PM.

Posted Image

Find us on Facebook too!



#92 David_LivinginTalisay

David_LivinginTalisay
  • Elite Member
  • 4,941 posts
  • 1257 thanks
  • 481 topics
  • Local time: 08:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Talisay City, Cebu
  • My Blood Type:O+
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 04 November 2010 - 08:49 PM

Posted Image
QLINK Motorcycles
Founded in 1988, QLINK Motor, located in the Dallas suburb of Grapevine, Tex., offers a full line or motorcycles, scooters, ATVs, side-by-sides and other products. With a distribution facility in Edwardsville, Pa., as well as branches in Mexico, Brazil, Hungary, Nigeria, Taiwan and China, the company is committed to servicing its dealers and customers--wherever they may be. Key models for the company include the Legacy 250, a 4-stroke, single cylinder, liquid cooled motorcycle with a fully automatic CVT transmission. QLINK also makes its Rodeo 700 and 500 ATVs, as well as its FrontRunner 700 and 500 side-by-sides, with automatic transmissions.



Story from http://www.motorcycl...view-88669.html


Posted Image


2009 QLINK XF200 Review

China steps up its motorcycle game

story by Pete Brissette, Photograph by Alfonse Palaima, Erika Brissette, Created Aug. 20, 2009


The next dominant force in motorcycle manufacturing appears to be taking shape. In case you’ve not noticed, China is on the move.


The idea of Chinese-made bikes buzzing around the U.S. would’ve been crazy talk only 15 years ago. Now you can’t walk into a chain auto parts store and not notice at least one two-wheeler, if not an entire section devoted to small-displacement scooters and motorcycle-like…things, all tagged with a Made in China decal.


Most motorcycles from China aren’t up to the level of quality many of us in America have come to expect from, say, Japan. But whether we want to admit it or not, the Chinese machines are getting better – or at least some are.


Posted Image

QLINK might not be a household name in the U.S., but the distribution company has a presence in Mexico, Brazil, Hungary, Nigeria, Taiwan, and of course China. And according to the company’s website, it has three distributions centers here: Dallas, TX, Los Angeles, CA and Edwardsville, PA. The company has a growing U.S. presence so we wanted to take a look at what they had to offer. In this instance we’ll be reviewing the XF200. To us it strikes an obvious supermoto pose though QLINK doesn’t necessarily bill it as such, rather as a dual-purpose motorcycle.



Spoiler





#93 David_LivinginTalisay

David_LivinginTalisay
  • Elite Member
  • 4,941 posts
  • 1257 thanks
  • 481 topics
  • Local time: 08:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Talisay City, Cebu
  • My Blood Type:O+
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 04 November 2010 - 09:40 PM

Posted Image
QLINK Motorcycles
Founded in 1988, QLINK Motor, located in the Dallas suburb of Grapevine, Tex., offers a full line or motorcycles, scooters, ATVs, side-by-sides and other products. With a distribution facility in Edwardsville, Pa., as well as branches in Mexico, Brazil, Hungary, Nigeria, Taiwan and China, the company is committed to servicing its dealers and customers--wherever they may be. Key models for the company include the Legacy 250, a 4-stroke, single cylinder, liquid cooled motorcycle with a fully automatic CVT transmission. QLINK also makes its Rodeo 700 and 500 ATVs, as well as its FrontRunner 700 and 500 side-by-sides, with automatic transmissions.



QLINK Responds to Motorcycle.com's XF200 Review

Posted ImageQLINK have published a post on their blog to respond to the QLINK XF200 bike review that was published on motorcycle.com. After reading the review, QLINK felt there were some issues that were raised in the article that needed more explanation and clarity.


Hit the jump to read what they had to say.




2009 QLINK XF200 Review
Motorcycle.com just released the product review for 2009 QLINK XF200 Supermoto on its website. This product review was setup almost two months ago by motorcycle.com. After reading this review, we would like to respond to some points not revealed in this article.

First of all, we are so grateful that Mr. Brisette and his team made such insightful review on QLINK XF200. QLINK will continue to push XF200 to another higher level based on all comments from this review and readers' feedback.

A lot of people are still confused about who is QLINK. QLINK actually is established in 1988 in Taipei, Taiwan, and now QLINK has become a multinational group having companies in USA, Mexico, Brazil, Nigeria, Hungary, and China. Technically speaking, QLINK does not produce any vehicles. What QLINK does is to search the best products from different manufacturers to make up its product line. So far none of a single Chinese manufacturer can make all powersports products. Some are specialized in scooter, and some are focusing on off-road bikes. As a result, QLINK has made commitment to becoming a platform providing the best value products from different manufacturers. Yes, you may see same product that QLINK has and someone else has also, but QLINK is rearranging its product line to be all exclusive, such as Megelli series.

So, what is the relationship between QLINK and Jinan Qingqi?

Just like what I have mentioned above, Jiana Qingqi is one of QLINK's manufacturers in China and QLINK has exclusivity to sell XF200 and XP200 in USA. QLINK was told by Qingqi that it has joint venture with Suzuli in China to produce engines for Suzuki. In fact, it's very common for Chinese manufacturers to have some sort of cooperation with foreign companies in China. The major reasons for this kind of cooperation. One is that foreign companies can take advantage of lower labor cost in China for production. Second is that those foreign companies can sell technology to Chinese manufacturers and open Chinese market via those Chinese manufacturers they work with.

Last but not least, QLINK is trying to provide the best value products in the market. In this review, it mentioned about some parts are not highest quality compared with Japanese bikes. However, we need to know our strategy is not to cope with Japanese manufacturers but to fill in the gap that people want more affordable price but still acceptable quality and warranty. Most of QLINK products are at least 30% less than Japanese brands but double length of period for warranty. Moreover, all QLINK street bikes come with one year free roadside assistance. I have to say that it is your business if you decide to pay more, but it is QLINK's business if you want to pay less!


http://qlinkmotor.co...ucts.php?pid=74

Posted Image Posted ImagePosted Image


Posted Image
Posted ImagePosted Image

Posted Image




Edited by David_LivinginTalisay, 04 November 2010 - 11:02 PM.


#94 thebob

thebob

    The one and only.

  • VIP
  • 10,090 posts
  • 2503 thanks
  • 338 topics
  • Local time: 09:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Moalboal
  • My Blood Type:AB+
  • Philippines:Visited 9 times +

Posted 04 November 2010 - 10:15 PM

Hyosung are available in Japan, they are sold in the Red Baron chain of motorcycle stores, one of the largest chains in Japan. Pricing is approximately 80% of a comparable Japanese bike, and they come with nationwide dealer servicing and spares support. They are struggling to stay in business because they can't compete on quality.

The Koreans have decades of experience and a huge local market, even their R&D is Japan based. Even with these advantages, Hyosung can hardly stay in business there.

http://www.hsmc.jp/

If the Chinese ever manage to produce a motorcycle, that they keep in production for a few years, and build a parts and service network, they may have a slim chance of gaining a reputation.

Presently their output is inferior clones of 25 year old Japanese engines with dubious styling jobs to make them look pretty. They are equipped with horrendous tires, brakes, and electrical systems. The interchangeability of many parts between the small CB and XL honda engines and the Yamaha TW engines is no coincidence. Unfortunately the noninterchangeable parts are where the cost cutting and design defects raise their ugly head.

Exports are considered as one off business deals and so dealers in the west pop up and disappear with frightening regularity. I would consider one of these bikes as a disposable trinket, and would not trust my life, let alone my business, to such a misguided purchase.

#95 David_LivinginTalisay

David_LivinginTalisay
  • Elite Member
  • 4,941 posts
  • 1257 thanks
  • 481 topics
  • Local time: 08:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Talisay City, Cebu
  • My Blood Type:O+
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 04 November 2010 - 11:05 PM

Posted Image
QLINK Motorcycles
Founded in 1988, QLINK Motor, located in the Dallas suburb of Grapevine, Tex., offers a full line or motorcycles, scooters, ATVs, side-by-sides and other products. With a distribution facility in Edwardsville, Pa., as well as branches in Mexico, Brazil, Hungary, Nigeria, Taiwan and China, the company is committed to servicing its dealers and customers--wherever they may be. Key models for the company include the Legacy 250, a 4-stroke, single cylinder, liquid cooled motorcycle with a fully automatic CVT transmission. QLINK also makes its Rodeo 700 and 500 ATVs, as well as its FrontRunner 700 and 500 side-by-sides, with automatic transmissions.


http://www.qlinkmoto...%20XF%20200.pdf
So hopefully you now understand that some QLINK (of the USA) Motorcycles, like the Jiana Qingqi, in China.




2009 Honda CRF230M vs. 2009 QLINK XF200

Lo-Po Su-Mo Comparo!

Life's full of trade-offs. Rarely do most of us get to have all that we want without making concessions of some sort.
You want a big house in a great neighborhood? Then expect a big price tag. You'd like exhilarating levels of performance and durability in your automobile, but don't want to pay prices at the top of the market? For the most part you can fugehaboudit.

The motorbike world is no different. Even down in the ranks of small-displacement machines there are sacrifices to make.

Depending on your wants and needs, and what you can or cannot live without, we think you'll find that comparing trade-offs is a good approach to lining-up the 2009 Honda CRF230M and the QLINK XF200.



Posted Image


2009 Honda CRF230M and 2009 Qlink XF200. East versus…East!

2009 Honda CRF230M Specs
2009 QLINK XF200 Specs




In recent reviews of this pair of lightweight supermotos we learned that each is powered by an air-cooled Single. The Honda's ever-so-slightly undersquare 223cc (65.5 x 66.2mm) one-lunger spun off a max of 14.5 hp at 7,200 rpm and 11.6 ft-lbs at 6,300 rpm. That's about 1.3 horsepower and 1.1 ft-lbs more than the QLINK's 199cc (66 x 58.2mm) engine produced on the Hypercycle dyno. Many thanks to our pal Carry Andrew for the dyno time.



Posted ImagePosted Image



Posted Image


The spread of power between the CRF-M and XF is barely one pony and foot-pound. But that small amount makes all the difference in the Honda. Getting the QLINK to do this was all but impossible.



So, the Honda has around 10% more displacement, and makes about 10% more power. No big whoop, you say, it's only a pony or so. True. But with engines of this size a 1 hp difference is noticeable. Account for the Honda's longer stroke, and the sensation that it's generating more torque off the bottom than the XF200 isn't just in your head.

"...with engines of this size a 1 hp difference is noticeable."


Read more ...


Posted Image



Posted Image
2009 HondaCRF230MMSRP $4,749
http://www.qingqi.co...how.aspx?id=132

Posted Image
Qingqi qm200GY-B(A)

The original maker is JINAN QINGQI, model QM200GY-BA also known as QM200GY-B(A) for the Super Motard version

Shandong Pioneer and called XF200GY-B this is some sort of subsidiary of the main factory.

In USA it's the QLINK XF200 Supermoto and they're located in Grapevine,Texas, web site http://www.qlinkmotor.com/contact.php

In Brasil it's called a STX 200 Motard Sundown

In the UK it appears as:

Pulse Adrenaline
Sinnis Apache QM200GY
and Superbyke RMR200

Chile/Colombia QMT200 or GXT Euromot
Honduras Genesis Supermoto or KMF
Spain it's marketed by Qingqi importer direct or I-moto as a Tiger sm 125
Turkey it's a Ramzey QM200GY
Checkoslovakia it's a YUKI 250 SM
Russia it's called QINGQI DRAGON 200 SUPERMOTO
France Hooper SMR
Germany it's imported by the prestigious Kreidler as a Supermoto 125 DD
Australia Arqin motorcycles RT200SM
Sweden they call it a TMS Supermotard 200cc
Ukraine its a SkyMoto Dragon-200
Philippines it's a SINSKY Motard 200R



CPI Motorcycles (Taiwan)CPI motorcycles are introducing their products. In partnership with SINSKI motorcycles.

Brutale, Naked/Standard 200cc motorcycle. SRP Php 89K
Posted Image

Motard, Dual sports 200cc motorcycle. SRP Php 86K

Posted Image




CPI motorcycleshttp://cpi-ph.com/

Posted Image
Posted Image Posted ImagePosted Image Posted ImagePosted Image Posted ImagePosted Image Posted Image

http://cpi-ph.com/motard.html
Posted Image


Edited by David_LivinginTalisay, 04 November 2010 - 11:19 PM.


#96 David_LivinginTalisay

David_LivinginTalisay
  • Elite Member
  • 4,941 posts
  • 1257 thanks
  • 481 topics
  • Local time: 08:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Talisay City, Cebu
  • My Blood Type:O+
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 05 November 2010 - 12:32 AM

Hyosung are available in Japan, they are sold in the Red Baron chain of motorcycle stores, one of the largest chains in Japan. Pricing is approximately 80% of a comparable Japanese bike, and they come with nationwide dealer servicing and spares support. They are struggling to stay in business because they can't compete on quality.

The Koreans have decades of experience and a huge local market, even their R&D is Japan based. Even with these advantages, Hyosung can hardly stay in business there.

http://www.hsmc.jp/

...



'thebob' is this just your 'opinion', or do you have any factual basis, backing such bold assertion, that Hyosung are struggling to stay in business in Japan?
Why no URL Hyperlink Quoted, so we can verify what you have posted?


Wikipedia

Hyosung today


Recently, they have expanded from their traditional business of simple and efficient bikes for commuting into the highly competitive recreational market. This includes adding models with larger engine displacement, up to 678cc and expanding into developed markets such as Australia, Northern Europe, Canada, and the United States.


This has sparked owners groups for the largely unknown company. One of the main ones being http://ukhyo-ownersclub.co.uk. The UK Hyosung Owners Club. A group of people who meet up often for rides together, and to share knowledge and expertise on the brand. Small groups such as this one are making the Hyosung brand a more well known name within the motorcycling community.


No mention in that Wikipedia article of expanding into Japan, but there is a website

www.hyosung.co.jp/

Posted Image <br style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; ">Japan Hyosunmota

Posted Image Posted Image
http://www.redbaron.co.jp/english/


Movie Impressions FULL LINEUP
Hiraku Kimi 09.12.10

RED BARON movie sites, public impressions of all models released in Japan.
In the course of Nasu Motor Sports Land, and charm us with detailed explanation and performance of each model.

Posted Image

RED BARON movie can be found at the site

http://translate.goo...DBR%26prmd%3Div


Posted Image


http://korider.com/i...p?topic=16632.0

http://korider.com/i...p?topic=13658.0


More on Hyosung

http://forum.svrider...hp/t-41972.html



Hyosung GT650 vs. Suzuki SV650

By Gabe Ets-Hokin, Jul. 23, 2005
Attached File  hyosung-gt650-vs-suzuki-sv650-14284.pdf   279.42KB   42 downloads


Hyosung GT650R Review


Can Korea Compete With Japan Inc?
By Yossef Schvetz, Feb. 06, 2008, Photography by Itamar Rotem
Attached File  hyosung-gt650r-review-75270.pdf   150.24KB   42 downloads




http://uk.answers.ya...25043151AAoiRYP

Hyosung GT650R and Hyosung GT250R versus Suzuki SV650?
I have read about these new motorcycles from the Korean maker Hyosung. If you own one or have information other than that easily sourced from a google search, then I would appreciate it. Has anyone experienced huge depreciation? Is the price difference (£600) offsetting the depreciation? Have you experienced problems with servicing or sourcing parts? I do know that the dealer network is a bit thin on the ground, so has anyone thought of opening a dealership? Is there much of a profit in selling new ones? The list of questions goes on LOL.

http://www.hyosung.c...detail.php?id=4
http://www.hyosung.c...detail.php?id=6

Have a look and send your answers.
Oh, Nope I am not a dealership.
Bad points I already know -
Weak Brakes
Skinny Rear Tyre
Dealer Support
Good Points I already know -
Price
Build Quality
Looks

  • 4 years ago





skadamo



Best Answer - Chosen by Asker
Here are some common issues with the GT650...
http://www.korider.c...viewlink&cid=36


Here are some for the GT250...
http://www.korider.c...viewlink&cid=38


Hope that helps.
Source(s):
www.korider.com

  • 4 years ago


Asker's Rating:Posted ImageAsker's Comment:It seems to me that most answers were given by people that have never been anywhere near this bike, quoting hearsay. The answer I have picked is the only one which points towards actual owners and users of the model. Its probably a gamble to buy this bike, but Its worth it to be different.


Edited by David_LivinginTalisay, 05 November 2010 - 01:11 AM.


#97 indiana

indiana

    indianajoe

  • Sponsor
  • 344 posts
  • 52 thanks
  • 5 topics
  • Local time: 07:21 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:mishawaka indiana / camotes cebu
  • My Blood Type:A+
  • Philippines:Visited 9 times +

Posted 05 November 2010 - 01:52 AM

i have two harleys 3 hondas 1 kawaski and a 175 rockata from china had it 3 years now no trouble except my friends telling me its junk .... it still runs fine and get me where i am going looking to buy another soon in cebu. :bashtroll:
  • David_LivinginTalisay likes this

#98 David_LivinginTalisay

David_LivinginTalisay
  • Elite Member
  • 4,941 posts
  • 1257 thanks
  • 481 topics
  • Local time: 08:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Talisay City, Cebu
  • My Blood Type:O+
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 05 November 2010 - 10:12 PM

i have two harleys 3 hondas 1 kawaski and a 175 rockata from china had it 3 years now no trouble except my friends telling me its junk .... it still runs fine and get me where i am going looking to buy another soon in cebu. :ROFLMAO:


I have only owned 1 x Chinese Bike, Loncin T200 'Terminator' .


Posted Image

Yes there was a problem with it - the Rectifier/ Volrage Control unit was faulty.

One had to remove the Tank to find the finned heat sink Module bolted to the frame in the cooling air stream. Cost for replacement Php160 (OK so it was not genuine Loncin, just a 'generic' Rectifier/ Volrage Control unit with the right size/spacing of the mounting holes, and sufficient wattage. Actually the connector plug unit was not compatible, so un-soldered the leads, and soldered them to the connector off the faulty unit.

So the Questions is "Why did the previous Owner not do just this to Fix the problem?"


Because the 'Owner' was in the USA and it got 'fixed' by some local 'bodger' who 'pretends' to be a mechanic/electrician, could not be bothered to remove the Tank most likely? Instead he sliced open the wiring loom to find the AC output of the Alternator, and 'spliced' (twisted the wires around the lead of the Diode, and wrapped with insulating tape) 4 Diodes into the Wiring, to form a Bridge Rectifier.

There are 2 x Problems with this -
i) There is no 'Voltage Regulation' to prevent the Battery from being Overcharged,
ii) The Diodes will get HOT (that is why the original Rectifier/ Volrage Control unit was a finned Heatsink module, mounted in a cooling airstream).

This could have melted the bike wiring next to these Diodes, might have shorted the wiring and even caused a fire!

Then some blame PROBLEMS with their Chinese Motorcycle, as being down to poor Chinese Product Quality!


My first motorcycle was a 1964 Honda C92 'Benly' that I bought as a 'non-runner' for £20 in 1976.


Posted Image
When 'new' the C92 might have looked like this (but mine was red, and had a black seat)

The reason it was a 'non-runner' was due to the wiring loom having got 'pinched' by the 'steering stops', and cut through the insulation on some of the wires - easily fixed with wire cutters/strippers, soldering iron, heat shrink tubing and insulting tape. The second problem was it was stuck in 2nd gear! The previous owner, had obviously tried brute force - and sheared the splines of the selector shaft with the gear lever pedal. He had tried 'araldite' to put that problem right. Actually on stripping the engine apart, ir was just a small detent retaining spring on the selector quadrant, on the far end of the gear lever shaft, had come off, stopping the selector 'pawl' from engaging. I decided to buy a new gear Selector Shaft (cost about £1 and 79 pence), as easier (and cheaper) than welding the damaged end to build it back up to full diameter then machining some new splines.

I used this twin cylinder 125cc Honda, with Electric Start, mirrors and Indicators, and it's ugly, utilitarian pressed steel chassis and huge (but practical) mudguards, for nearly 2 years. commuting about 16 miles round trip each day Mon-Fri SRDE, Christchurch, from Queens Park, in Bournemouth. together with trips of 80 miles or more @ weekends.

Japanese motor bikes did not have a particularly good reputation back then in 1964 when that C92 was built. But by the late 70's they were emerging as the new Superbikes, with the Honda 750-4 (CB750)

Posted Image

Then I sold the Honda C92, and bought a Norton Command 750cc Roadster (which won the Motor Cycle News "Bike of the Year" for 5 x consecutive Years 1968-72)

Posted Image

I would consider buying a new generation Chinese Dual Sport, with 4 Stroke Water cooled engine, and inverted front forks, and having a displacement of 250cc or larger and preferably costing under Php120K.

There are several Chinese Motorcycles I have posted to this Thread, that would fit that bill, but would need to have fairly low seat height, that counts out many of them.

Then we need a good Distributor in Cebu, that offers Service and Spares!

Edited by David_LivinginTalisay, 05 November 2010 - 10:40 PM.


#99 David_LivinginTalisay

David_LivinginTalisay
  • Elite Member
  • 4,941 posts
  • 1257 thanks
  • 481 topics
  • Local time: 08:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Talisay City, Cebu
  • My Blood Type:O+
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:05 PM

http://blog.marshall...ikes.com/?p=447

Posted Image Motoposh SBK200 vs. Yamaguchi Hurricane 150
December 7th, 2010 | Author: Larry Marshall

Posted Image

Motoposh SBK200

There has been some talk recently about the Motoposh SBK200 on theFacebook Fan Club. So I thought I would share my two cents on the subject.

At least this time we are actually talking about a sports bike. I see so many comments from people trying to do comparisons to a Raider which is an underbone (small bike). That is like comparing apples to oranges just because they are both a fruit. Posted Image

First let's look at the positive side of the Motoposh SBK200. First off you are getting a 200cc engine. You are also getting dual disc front brakes which is very cool, and something I have planned for my personal Yamaguchi Hurricane 250 in the near future. Personally, I also like the side mirrors being attached to the head rather than on the handlebars like the current Hurricane models. I have not seen this bike in person as of yet, so I can't tell you how big the U-Box is. That was a major complaint of mine on the Motorstar Explorer Z200 is it really doesn't have a U-Box. Whereas the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150 has a HUGE U-Box. So big in fact, that you could put a pair of tennis shoes (called "rubber shoes" in the Philippines) and probably still have room left over. I also like the wider tires on the Motoposhwhich is one of my complaints about the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150 and another of my planned upgrades on my personal bike.

Posted Image
Motoposh SBK200

Now for the negative side. These are just my own personal opinions, and since it's my blog, I get to express my personal opinions. (hahaha) Anyways, the seat is not good looking at all. Having a 1 piece seat on a sports bike is just not sexy at all. It's like looking at a girl wearing a long jacket versus a girl wearing a 2 piece bikini. (hahaha) Posted Image

The design looking at it from the rear is just weird having a very skinny back end that protrudes out to the wide gas tank. The muffler is almost as wide as the tail end of the bike. LOL. At least the Motorstar Explorer Z200 is a nice wide bike at the seat and rear.

I'm not crazy about the fairing package as I believe the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150 has a more "sexy" looking body with it's fairing package. However, at least this bike does have full fairings which is WAY better than the "naked" look of the Motorstar Explorer Z200.

All in all, it's not a bad bike from a looks standpoint. However, if we are talking about comparing the "sexiness" of the bike comparing the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150, theMotoposh SBK200 and the Motorstar Explorer Z200, the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150 wins hands down in my opinion. If we decide to throw in the Phoenix (formerly Belletza) from Vama Motors, that's another story, as the Phoenix is very "sexy" from a looks standpoint. But as a "junior sports bike" it is just simply too small and low to the ground.

Of course all the above I have discussed, is more related to the looks of the Motoposh SBK200. And as they say, looks are not everything. A big concern on everyone's mind is quality. We already know, just from reading the forums online that the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150 has the best quality record of any sports bike that comes out of China. The Motorstar Explorer Z250 was discontinued being distributed by Motorstar due to the number of problems from aquality standpoint. The Z200 on the other hand, had way less problems as compared to theZ250 which is why it's still around. But from a repairs standpoint, the Z200 loses the quality test to the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150. The same goes for the Phoenix as well. Let's face it, the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150 is well known for it's high quality in the sports bike arena of bikes made in China. That speaks volumes. I have not read a lot of negative comments yet on the Motoposh SBK200 from a quality standpoint as of yet, but for me, I would rather have something that is tried and tested as being great quality, not to mention a more "sexy" look in a sports bike.

Posted Image
Motoposh SBK200 New Model

I was just informed that the above article actually has pictures of the previous model of the Motoposh SBK200 and that the designed has changed for the new model. So I am updating my blog post to include this information.

The new model is WAY better than their previous model from a looks standpoint and much closer to the look of the Honda CBR-150. I still don't like the headlights and head on the new model as compared to theYamaguchi Hurricane 150. Note that they also switched from dual front disc brakes to a single front disc brake which wasn't a smart decision in my opinion. Since this is also a new model, I don't know if enough people have purchased this model to ensure it's quality. So only time will tell on that.



#100 DeezNuz

DeezNuz
  • Elite Member
  • 3,507 posts
  • 506 thanks
  • 151 topics
  • Local time: 09:21 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Los Angeles,CA USA & Cebu, Phil
  • My Blood Type:I will not donate
  • Philippines:Current resident

Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:15 PM

I still believe anything under 600cc cannot be considered a sport bike. A moped, yes...a scooter, yes...sport bike, no.



"Most brand name small bikes, have a starting price tag of roughly P80,000 for a 125cc engine. However, the Yamaguchi Hurricane 150 packs a whopping 150cc engine..."

WHOPPING 150cc engine???? Why is that bettter?
It's like saying the engine in my Ford Escort is better than the one in your Chevy Sprint...why does it matter? They're both pieces of shit!


Next thing you know the Chinese will make a new brand called Suzukiwaka...and blow away the competition with their 159cc engine.


Well...I guess they have to get a little outrageous with the copywriting on their marketing campaigns...its not like they have a big market available to them other than the Philippines.

Edited by BigRob, 08 December 2010 - 09:19 PM.





1 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


Copyright © 2014 Living In Cebu Forums / Woody Paul Petrea