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      Hello. If you are a new member, and feel a bit apprehensive about posting in the "open" forums, or, just wish to get your "sea legs" prior to posting in the open forums, feel free to post anything you wish to talk about, in the Newbies Forum. No one will bother you, or give you any sort of grief. Everyone there is happy to help you get answers to your questions.
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Paul

How to Plot Typhoons

14 posts in this topic


I can only recommend this website, i used it during my active sailing days ! Also the the professional crews on the New ships leaving Balamban used it to my amazement, although they have real good pay sites on the ships bridge, but Captains usually make their decisions based on many data sources.

 

It my seems complicated at first, btu ater a few hours checking it, you get a pretty good idea.

 

Also good are the links within, ranging from Japanese and US Navy weatherbureaus to the infamous Philippine PAGASA.

 

As one very experienced Captain pointed out to me one day : " All the weather info and prediction is good, but don't forget, that the advisories are written by some geeks who think its a entertaining computergame and never have been in a storm or at sea, so get all the info's you can get and then make your own forecast"

 

I would not completely agree with that, but the bottomline is, that one can not really predict the weather.

 

One critical remark to PAGASA is, which kind of course does a poor Nation and its school system offers to interested applicants of "Weatherforecasting" and what people get employment there?

If it is the same criteria (Nepotism) as in other goverments sectors one can only predict more disasters to come.

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I can only recommend this website, i used it during my active sailing days ! Also the the professional crews on the New ships leaving Balamban used it to my amazement, although they have real good pay sites on the ships bridge, but Captains usually make their decisions based on many data sources.

 

It my seems complicated at first, btu ater a few hours checking it, you get a pretty good idea.

 

Also good are the links within, ranging from Japanese and US Navy weatherbureaus to the infamous Philippine PAGASA.

 

As one very experienced Captain pointed out to me one day : " All the weather info and prediction is good, but don't forget, that the advisories are written by some geeks who think its a entertaining computergame and never have been in a storm or at sea, so get all the info's you can get and then make your own forecast"

 

I would not completely agree with that, but the bottomline is, that one can not really predict the weather.

 

One critical remark to PAGASA is, which kind of course does a poor Nation and its school system offers to interested applicants of "Weatherforecasting" and what people get employment there?

If it is the same criteria (Nepotism) as in other goverments sectors one can only predict more disasters to come.

 

Realistically on the bridge we are provided with all that we need, we are provided with all the information we need to make a sensible decision, whether its a the SAT C Telex (which provides a printed list of areas, conditions and forecast), Navtex (a localised system of the same), Weatherfax which provides Analysis and Synoptic weather charts where you have the information to make your own predictions of the weather.

Then obviously the weather measuring equipment onboard can be used to detect a Tropical Revolving Storm through decreases in barometric pressure when compared against the diurnal range and mean for the area.

All that said, the internet provides some great information, and websites such as Typhoon2000, Windfinder etc are fantastic for getting detail, seeing graphic representation, longer term forecasts etc.

A good mariner will always strive to avoid adverse weather, but in commercial shipping the commercial pressures do encourage Captains to push the limits, and occasionally that results in a ship in conditions it shouldn't have been in. I've had the misfortune of being the Officer On Watch in heavy weather with serious injuries to passengers on an 82,000 GT cruise liner, not a great experience. Better to avoid it all when possible.

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Obtaining up-to-date weather information is not easy in the Philippines other than directly calling the appropriate controlling agency

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Thanks for these weather links ... I've always had trouble here keeping up with the storms here ... They can become a big issue as the travel between islands on boats can be stopped here for 1-2 days with little notice ..

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I registered with the Puerto Galera yacht Club, they always send me any  information regarding inclement weather in the Philippines. The Japanese wather satellite Kochi University tracks every 6 hours and was accurate when tracking Bopha last december.

 

The coaatguard here are particulary vigilent about any vessels leaving port if there is a signal 1 or greater. They had their fingers burnt when Typhoon Frank hit the philippines in 2009.

 

if at sea during a tyrphoon especially on a small yacht then you are on your own. Many yacht races have proved that - ie fastnet 1980 and the sydney - Hobart.. Best to batten down , sea anchor out, but I am no expert, Have been through typhoons , hurricanes during 30 years at sea and really i prayed at times. One occasion on 6000 ton  ro ro crossing English channel we were hit by a hurricane force 13 > Stabilizers failed and cargo shifted - we rolled 48 degrees = 6 degs short of rollover stability. If you are a seaman its part of the job, but I didn't like it.   

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Regarding the Typhoon Tracking, are you serious?

 

We've had "Hurricane" Tracking charts in the states since I was a kid in Houston, Texas. They hand out charts each hurricane season to anyone that wants one. Its not hard to follow coordinates. Listen to the radio/tv.. put a DOT on the coordinate.. next update, do the same thing. Problem I always had was determining the SIZE of the storm.

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I registered with the Puerto Galera yacht Club, they always send me any  information regarding inclement weather in the Philippines. The Japanese wather satellite Kochi University tracks every 6 hours and was accurate when tracking Bopha last december.

 

The coaatguard here are particulary vigilent about any vessels leaving port if there is a signal 1 or greater. They had their fingers burnt when Typhoon Frank hit the philippines in 2009.

 

if at sea during a tyrphoon especially on a small yacht then you are on your own. Many yacht races have proved that - ie fastnet 1980 and the sydney - Hobart.. Best to batten down , sea anchor out, but I am no expert, Have been through typhoons , hurricanes during 30 years at sea and really i prayed at times. One occasion on 6000 ton  ro ro crossing English channel we were hit by a hurricane force 13 > Stabilizers failed and cargo shifted - we rolled 48 degrees = 6 degs short of rollover stability. If you are a seaman its part of the job, but I didn't like it.   

Still think I'd rather take my chances at sea in a large ship then alongside with a typhoon approaching in most ports. Admittedly though, with pax onboard and cars, you've got a few more factors to consider. I had a stabiliser failure between the Falklands and Chile on a cruise ship in poor weather and had some major pax injuries when we had to alter beam on to the swell to get into the fjords for shelter.

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Heres the tracki of the Bopha/pablo that hit mindinao.  dec 2012 . Unfortunaely my yacht was anchored in the mooring berth next to the dry dock at jasaan waiting for a new engine. When the typhoon strcuk my crew were stranded in cebu withe new engine. Skeleton crew moored alongside para seacat  with truck tyres in between. She still rolled like a bitch and was demasted. Not really a typhoon haven. Best typhoon escapes holes are Puerto Galera and Port Bonbonon in South Negros if you can make it.   

post-7590-0-58527600-1373753000_thumb.jpg

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I can only recommend this website

 

Agreed!

 

It was sad that in a knee-jerk reaction to Ondoy, the President thought fit to remove the head of PAGASA from his post for 'not warning everyone.'  Yet I knew the typhoon was coming, by following this site, and watched its late course alteration to pass just north of Manila.  I was able to tidy up loose items and minimize any damage.  At the time I was so incensed that I nearly sent Malacanang the URL link.

 

I have this site as one of my home page tabs on my web browser.

Edited by GoHuk

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