• Announcements

    • Paul

      New Members: Click Here   03/09/2017

      Hello. If you are a new member, and feel a bit apprehensive about posting in the "open" forums, or, just wish to get your "sea legs" prior to posting in the open forums, feel free to post anything you wish to talk about, in the Newbies Forum. No one will bother you, or give you any sort of grief. Everyone there is happy to help you get answers to your questions.
  • Commercial Banner Advertisers

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Bukwali

drill your own water well

22 posts in this topic

Our water supply generally has poor pressure, so we fill our two 600 Ltr water tanks during the night [that's when pressure is best] and use this water to service our place through out the day. some of our neighbors have water wells, so we made some informal inquires into the costs and it seems to be around the 25,000 php mark for drilling a well but know guarantees they'll hit water, I've seen water wells drilled in other developing countries with hand augers and a small solar power pump added which seemed very cheap and effective,that is of course until the drilling team leave and the solar panel is stolen. the reason I mention this is while I was doing some searching on the net I found this youtube video of a very simple and cheap method of drilling a well, just thought others might find it interesting, could be useful for lowland agricultural projects or farming of livestock

 

 

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our water supply generally has poor pressure, so we fill our two 600 Ltr water tanks during the night [that's when pressure is best] and use this water to service our place through out the day. some of our neighbors have water wells, so we made some informal inquires into the costs and it seems to be around the 25,000 php mark for drilling a well but know guarantees they'll hit water, I've seen water wells drilled in other developing countries with hand augers and a small solar power pump added which seemed very cheap and effective,that is of course until the drilling team leave and the solar panel is stolen. the reason I mention this is while I was doing some searching on the net I found this youtube video of a very simple and cheap method of drilling a well, just thought others might find it interesting, could be useful for lowland agricultural projects or farming of livestock

 

 

 

John

 

 

 

 

 

there is a rumor going around that you need permission to dig a well now as the government is claiming the water ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the area of Canada that I come from, the well water is too Alkali for humans to drink (well you can drink it but it tastes terrible and it rusts your pipes so we generally give it to the cattle). We solve that problem in a few different ways but one popular way is to put a cistern in the ground, galvanized tin on your roof, and run rain water into the cistern. The cistern needs to be big enough so the dirt all settles to the bottom and you only actually use the top 2/3 then clean it out once in a while. If you are a sanitation freak you add a little bleach to the water to chlorinate it and some people use a filter on the tap they drink out of. I'm alive to tell you its good water.

 

So, with all the rain we get here, and all the tin roofs, why doesn't anyone use that system here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
there is a rumor going around that you need permission to dig a well now as the government is claiming the water ...

 

Water drilling permit from the DENR.

 

Requires a geological survey to estimate the impact on the size of the aquifer.

 

Then planing permission from the municipality.

 

Permit to operate.

 

Then monthly analysis for the first 6 months. Yearly after that.

 

And it must be reported to BIR. because it increases taxable value.

 

And it should be annotated on your title.

 

Lots of hassle just for a hole on your property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where we live is inaccessible to city water, so we had a well dug. The charging for the labor is based on the price of the cylindrical tile they put in, example the tile cost 350, labor would also be 350. So if you have 15 tiles deep, the total would come up to 10,500pesos. We have 3 wells in our property. Before we only use it for washing, laundry and gardening. Now, we are also using it as our drinking water. We filter the water using a table top water purifier. We have a steady supply of water which is supplied throughout the house with our 1/2 HP pressure pump.

 

Here's a blog from an expat building his house here in Iloilo. He explains how his well was dug.

 

http://goiloilo.com/category/our-house-project/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our well is 56 feet. The water table here starts at 19 feet. It's common here for the well drillers to set up a large tripod with a pulley at the top. About three guys will pull the rope and drop a pipe with a pointed bit on the end. Another guy will guide the bit to hit the same place each time. It took about a week for them to hand drill my well. I have a 1 hp pump and pressure tank (80 gal.?) to supply three houses in the compound. I set the pressure switch to 30 to 50 psi so we have good strong pressure. We also just put in a MCWD connection as a backup. The water tastes clean but I won't drink it as we never had it tested. We used bottled water for drinking. I spent P10,000 for labor and P30,000 for materials. This was November 2005. I never asked about a permit and no one ever mentioned to me it was required.

Edited by M.Morey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Our well is 56 feet. The water table here starts at 19 feet. It's common here for the well drillers to set up a large tripod with a pulley at the top. About three guys will pull the rope and drop a pipe with a pointed bit on the end. Another guy will guide the bit to hit the same place each time. It took about a week for them to hand drill my well. I have a 1 hp pump and pressure tank (80 gal.?) to supply three houses in the compound. I set the pressure switch to 30 to 50 psi so we have good strong pressure. We also just put in a MCWD connection as a backup. The water tastes clean but I won't drink it as we never had it tested. We used bottled water for drinking. I spent P10,000 for labor and P30,000 for materials. This was November 2005. I never asked about a permit and no one ever mentioned to me it was required.

 

very impressive. thanks very much. michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the area of Canada that I come from, the well water is too Alkali for humans to drink (well you can drink it but it tastes terrible and it rusts your pipes so we generally give it to the cattle). We solve that problem in a few different ways but one popular way is to put a cistern in the ground, galvanized tin on your roof, and run rain water into the cistern. The cistern needs to be big enough so the dirt all settles to the bottom and you only actually use the top 2/3 then clean it out once in a while. If you are a sanitation freak you add a little bleach to the water to chlorinate it and some people use a filter on the tap they drink out of. I'm alive to tell you its good water.

 

So, with all the rain we get here, and all the tin roofs, why doesn't anyone use that system here?

 

Hi Dave, Yes water Harvesting is something that is underused, even if some have concerns as to the cleanliness it could still be used for flushing toilets or washing clothes etc [but i feel it's clean enough to Drink] my wife and I survived in Africa only from water catchment, we also had a successful garden made from soil dug from the road [red dust more than soil] plus cow manure, we watered the garden with used shower water and dish washing water,

 

my company also issued large canvass sheets to local villages each canvass had reinforced corners plus a steel reinforced 2" diameter hole in the centre, villages would then construct an underground tank, solid posts were then set equal distance around the tank, so when ever rain looked likely, the canvas sheet was suspended between the posts with the hole directly above the water tank, when it was dry the canvass was put away, we had a tin roof so water catchment was easy enough, not so easy in villages with traditional roofs, I have some figures some where for the amount of water that can be captured from a given m2 area of roof.

 

Pic one is where we collected our soil,

pic two some visitors came to see what we were doing with all that cow #*

pic three the established garden.

pic four My wife Jenny helping to cook in a mud hut in a local village, A nice bowl of African Ugali, as stable to Africa as Rice is to the Philippines

 

africansoil.jpg[/img]

 

garden1.jpg[/img]

 

garden2.jpg[/img]

 

african-womencompressed.jpg[/img]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Water drilling permit from the DENR.

 

Requires a geological survey to estimate the impact on the size of the aquifer.

 

Then planing permission from the municipality.

 

Permit to operate.

 

Then monthly analysis for the first 6 months. Yearly after that.

 

And it must be reported to BIR. because it increases taxable value.

 

And it should be annotated on your title.

 

Lots of hassle just for a hole on your property.

 

Hi Bob as I understand the requirements you need only declare your well if its for human consumption, in my case it will be more like a pipe in the ground than a fullblown well, If I do it I'll keep it under the radar and if asked tell them its for the garden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Where we live is inaccessible to city water, so we had a well dug. The charging for the labor is based on the price of the cylindrical tile they put in, example the tile cost 350, labor would also be 350. So if you have 15 tiles deep, the total would come up to 10,500pesos. We have 3 wells in our property. Before we only use it for washing, laundry and gardening. Now, we are also using it as our drinking water. We filter the water using a table top water purifier. We have a steady supply of water which is supplied throughout the house with our 1/2 HP pressure pump.

 

Here's a blog from an expat building his house here in Iloilo. He explains how his well was dug.

 

http://goiloilo.com/category/our-house-project/

 

Thanks misty, If I do go ahead, in my case it will be a pipe driven into the ground so tile casings wont be necessary, although I can see that tile would provide a better job than metal pipe, I read that galvanized pipe buried in soil has an average life of five years, I guess it depends on the standard of the pipe. perhaps Icould use a larger Diameter pipe and use that as a sleeve for some plastic pipes.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Commercial Banner Advertisers

  • Adsbygoogle

    Advert

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Donation Goals

    Modifications, Applications, & Plugins

    Purchase and renewal costs for themes and various features added to the forums.

    $30 USD added to cover PayPal fees.



    $231.01 of $280.00 goal reached.
    Donate Now
    Yearly Hosting Fees

    Yearly web hosting fees, $75 USD / month.

    $30 USD added to cover fees.



    $359.72 of $930.00 goal reached.
    Donate Now
    Software Licensing Renewal Fees

    This goal is 100% funded. Please choose one of the others to support.

    $50 USD every six months for software licensing.

    $15 USD added to cover PayPal fees.



    $115.08 of $115.00 goal reached.
    Donate Now
  • Donation Stats

    • Total Donations
      $705.81
    • Total Fees
      $29.19
    • Total Goals
      $1,325.00
    • Still Needed
      $619.19

    • $705.81 of $1,325.00 goal reached.
  • Adsbygoogle

    Advert