RFulmer

My Living off the Land Journey in Australia

21 posts in this topic

So recently decided I would sell my property in an outer city as I was not doing much or getting anywhere. I was nearly about to rent my apartment out and go live right in the city and do some part time work. This was mainly to cover mortgage payments and rates etc.

Then I looked at the other option more carefully which was to sell my place. The more I looked at this option the better it seems. This has always been a last resort option as I have strong beliefs property can make you money and the longer you can hold it for the better. Mine had made me a little profit over the years but nothing like some people have got in Sydney.

If I sell my place it will leave me around 100k in cash once the mortgage and everything else is covered. Not much for a middle aging guy but better than nothing. I have to make do with what I have. it could possible be another 20-30k if the current property sells for more,

My plan will be to budget for 100k ( I could get more)

  • Buy Van to drive and live in temporary, budget 10k max
  • Spend 70k max on property (includes fees etc)
  • That leaves me 20k in the bank to live on and use for tools, equipment.

The new property must offer at least 10 acres of usable land and with water supplies like a dam, river, creek etc

Over the next 10 years I will create a farm, resort, permaculture centre, dream home on the land. If there is a building I can use to stay in that is ideal but it will not be a deal breaker, The priority is to get the best land I can for the budget. I will live in the van if I have to. I will also create a small building to live in if nothing is there. I will also design and built a home and all the other buildings for my plan. I know authorities will be on my back so I will research them for each area I'm interested in before purchasing. If councils have bad reps It could be a factor in my purchasing decision. You are not usually allowed to live on your land in our nanny state and there are some good reasons like sewerage, rubbish etc. But I will organically organize everything. I may have to find a deep clearing right in the Forrest to live to keep them off my back until I can get proper approved plans etc.

I do have experience in gardening and landscaping which will help. I have also had my own permaculture garden a few years back at my earler home.

Now, the hard part is to work out what land I can use or not, this is where maybe anyone here that knows can help. I have seen some videos on how guys have turned parts of the desert into lush gardens with permaculture but I think some of these have taken years. I don't want to be waiting 10 years+ before I can enjoy it. So will I need to write of dry land or many parts of Australia or could I get some outback rural land that is nothing special and turn it into a productive mini farm in 3 years?

I'm thinking places that are on the NSW north coast and inland to the west, The lower to the south the better but it will depend on prices at the time when I'm ready to buy.

Here are some pictures of the type of land I'm interested in, does this type of dry land look workable in a 3 year time frame? it will have to have some water resources somewhere to create the changes:

image2.jpg.088154c038b2d23bc71a1c5e29492aa2.jpg

image6.jpg.c4919189d5b6d0fd289f70c35549a0a0.jpg

 

 

 

 

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to grow many types of plants, veggies, fruit etc and sell them later.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this one is a place I really like and seems more lush than the one I posted above plus it is much larger area for the price.

main.jpg.a62fbc80ff8f1b7df9f28972e6a95180.jpg

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is all this about just trying to create a sustainable living off of the land ? 

Are you going to sell the produce ...or just feed yourself .

I you don't have a water source you may as well spend your 100k at the casino.

So many variables in what can happen here , and the budget is very restrictive ,

Your setup costs may well be the same as the 70k purchase price that you are talking about just to get water and power and maybe a basic accommodation sorted out.

If you spend all or most of your budget purchasing a property you won't have any thing left to establish yourself with.

Not trying to dampen this down on you here , but just sticking a realistic viewpoint forward...

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, RFulmer said:

I want to grow many types of plants, veggies, fruit etc and sell them later.

Honestly if you do this you will have to eat your crop to prevent starving!!! 

Growing the usual produce on a small scale here is not even close to viable and would require a far bigger investment. For example you grow 5 acres of carrots and as they are ready to harvest the bloke down the road starts up his FMC's and harvests 8500 acres.. 

Suggest you do something totally different like grow an exotic that no one else has or a crop in a location that sees it on the market when others are not. Like the bloke at Ti Tree north of Alice who has over 100,000 grape vines and puts product on the city markets 6 weeks before anyone else (pre-xmas!) and makes a killing. 

Recommend you do a lot of research and wish you well with your dream. 

 

Edit: Looking at you pics reminds me, you will need to check out local regulations. In many areas the wankers wouldn't let you remove those trees for instance. 

Edited by Ozepete
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

11 hours ago, oztony said:

I you don't have a water source you may as well spend your 100k at the casino.

While I wouldn't do this due to it being a total waste of space (for me), I would make my primary living structure, as well as any and all outbuildings available for rainwater collecting. Anyway, this married couple in Southern Arizona have a "3,000 ft2 rain roof" (~279 m2) to collect the water they live off, there. @RFulmer

 

Edited by Paul
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

11 hours ago, oztony said:

Is all this about just trying to create a sustainable living off of the land ? 

Are you going to sell the produce ...or just feed yourself

It's all about living the life I want. I would like to sell produce or do something with produce as that will be a big part of my plan as I enjoy gardening. I will need to make a living as well so whether its selling produce or bringing in an income some other way I will have to see how this goes. A lot will depend on the land and location. If it's within a few hours of a city then selling produce will be fine but if it's half a days drive then I might need to think of other income methods. Making an income will only be a necessity to cover any costs including land rates. Eventually money will be something that is not thought of much as the farm becomes fully self sustainable.

I might just prefer to enjoy the quiet outback with very few people around, I will see what land I get and what I want to do at the time. I probably prefer the quiet route.

yep I plan to grow exotic and niche produce, not carrots etc. At the start I will obtain as many different seeds as I can so I can experiment with different crops, I already have a box full of seeds I have kept. The first year will be all about testing and experimenting. I have had a garden in the past and it was a permaculture project although at the time I had never heard of permaculture. I was turning a dry backyard into a living landscape making compost,veggie gardens, fruit trees etc.

10 hours ago, Ozepete said:

Edit: Looking at you pics reminds me, you will need to check out local regulations. In many areas the wankers wouldn't let you remove those trees for instance. 

yeah I will have to check out the details when I'm interested in a property. I really don't want to be too restricted.

Water will be important, the land will need to have a reliable year round source.

What about this land in the photos, do you think it can be workable or would it be too dry?

How hard would it be when you are up on hills but with creeks etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mate, I think I understand your dream of freedom from all the BS that the metro cocks up but I doubt that growing produce out in the donga to sell in the metro will work for you. There are just too many hurdles to jump over. For example, we had a 214 square kilo-meter lease on the AP lands in central Oz. . We were open cut mining but as a hobby grew grapes, lots of grapes cos we had unlimited good bore water. This went well for two to three years until the bloody white ants (termites) ate the vines old wood and they all died! Sort of unheard of but the sort of curved balls you have to face! Instead of growing stuff, have you considered gold detecting? A solid caravan hooked up to a cruiser ute and you can go anywhere, (Interior that is) The detectors sold by The Miners Den in Adelaide are now better than ever, about 10k. Getting the state permits is no big deal and away you go but best to pal up with an experienced miner for a start.  (And if you hit one like the Welcome Stranger, remember me! :good:)  

Good luck. 

6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Masanobu Fukuoka (福岡 正信?) (2 February 1913 – 16 August 2008) was a Japanese farmer and philosopher celebrated for his natural farming and re-vegetation of desertified lands. He was a proponent of no-till, no-herbicide grain cultivation farming methods traditional to many indigenous cultures,[1] from which he created a particular method of farming, commonly referred to as "Natural Farming" or "Do-nothing Farming".[2][3][4]

Fukuoka was the author of several Japanese books, scientific papers and other publications, and was featured in television documentaries and interviews from the 1970s onwards.[5] His influences went beyond farming to inspire individuals within the natural food and lifestyle movements. He was an outspoken advocate of the value of observing nature's principles.

One Straw Revolution , straw and clover seeds

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RFulmer said:

What about this land in the photos, do you think it can be workable or would it be too dry?

It's impossible to tell from a photo, you need to monitor the land for at least a year and check any historical records of the local weather. To be self sufficient you really need "lots" of land, to try and cover every eventuality. Remember the climate is only going to get hotter and drier.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Commercial Banner Advertisers

  • Adsbygoogle

    Advert

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Donation Goals

    Modifications, Applications, & Plugins

    Purchase and renewal costs for themes and various features added to the forums.

    $30 USD added to cover PayPal fees.



    $231.01 of $280.00 goal reached.
    Donate Now
    Yearly Hosting Fees

    Yearly web hosting fees, $75 USD / month.

    $30 USD added to cover fees.



    $439.72 of $930.00 goal reached.
    Donate Now
    Software Licensing Renewal Fees

    This goal is 100% funded. Please choose one of the others to support.

    $50 USD every six months for software licensing.

    $15 USD added to cover PayPal fees.



    $115.08 of $115.00 goal reached.
    Donate Now
  • Donation Stats

    • Total Donations
      $785.81
    • Total Fees
      $29.19
    • Total Goals
      $1,325.00
    • Still Needed
      $539.19

    • $785.81 of $1,325.00 goal reached.
  • Adsbygoogle

    Advert