MaKe

No more Blossoms/fruit on my Kalamansi

21 posts in this topic

I have a small calamansi tree on my deck which provided an abundance of fruit for the past 3 years.

Since May of last year it has refused to flower.  I've added new soil near it, used fertilizer, but to no avail.

Anyone have any suggestions for correcting this anomaly? 

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Is this tree in a container?  If so might it have become root-bound?  Also if so, watering becomes tricky. It could be the bottom roots are a bit too wet ,even when the top seems dry, or vice versa.  Also is it still getting full sun?

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Often fruit trees need pruning when they don't produce.

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We had three that stopped producing and died. We were told its because we didn't harvest the fruit.

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We also have a five-meter tall calamansi tree without any fruit.

The village kids come by and throw sticks in the tree to collect the fruit and sell it to the nearest sari-sari store... where we ransom it back at two pesos per head.

It's a very efficient system.

Ps.. The fish emulsion that JamesMusslewhite taught me to make works wonders on citrus trees but it sure stinks and you probably wouldn't want to use it around your deck.

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3 hours ago, MaKe said:

I have a small calamansi tree on my deck which provided an abundance of fruit for the past 3 years.

Since May of last year it has refused to flower.  I've added new soil near it, used fertilizer, but to no avail.

Anyone have any suggestions for correcting this anomaly? 

You might need to start sleeping with it. You have to be careful also very temperamental so sing it a song before you shut the lights out. Let me know how this works for you... Good luck

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Plants will typically do 1 of 2 things...Grow or reproduce. With a fruit tree reproduction is bearing fruit.

If you are fertilizing it with high Nitrogen levels, this should make it grow. Maybe backoff the fertilizer or stop completely for a while and see if this prods it into a reproductive cycle.

3 hours ago, rfm010 said:

Is this tree in a container?  If so might it have become root-bound?

Also a possible factor. Get a new pot with some more elbow room for the roots if needed and good soil to grow into. If it is root bound the roots may grow in circles around the extremety of the pot. If so, take a knife and make several vertical cuts into these circular roots when replanting. This will allow it to grow into the new soil quickly. Don't worry about hurting the plant...they love a little cut here and there.

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Posted (edited)

Sounds like both a nutrient and trace element deficiency. Citrus trees require a steady and abundant fertilization program and here in the tropics of the Philippines we tend to have heavy rainfall with a soil of high sandy content generally lacking in sufficient organic matter caused by the heavy leching of the soils. This heavy leching removes the needed trace elements from around the root ball as well as dilute fertile applications. .

I would suggest that you first prune away any dead growth to help promote new growth. Then apply a 13-13-13 Osmicote which is a coated NPK fertilizer that is time released but remember it is time activated and can last up to 14 months so do not over fertilize. Osmicote has the needed nitrogen, phosphorous and potash but also contains trace elements. As Bosshog stated fish emulsion is your best short-term solution which is generally a NPK 4-1-1 to 5-2-2 fertilizer. NPK means nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potassium but that fermented fish stew also contains over 60 different trace elements (micro-nutrients).

Nitrogen is a component of chlorophyll and aids in growth, leaf production, flower initiation, fruit set, fruit development and fruit; Phosphorus aids in photosynthesis, enzyme activity, and in the formation and movement of sugars which is essential in the flowers and developing fruit. Potassium is essential for the formation and functions of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, chlorophyll, and maintaining a balance of salts and water within plant cells. So NPK is very important but also is needed the micro-nutrients zinc, manganese, iron, copper and boron are essential to the development of flower production and general health. This I believe may be the heart of your problem. To keep it simple, as the buds and flowers begin to form they cannot produce the required bonding agents within the physiology of the bud or flower. This imbalance or deficiency prevents the properly development, set or hold if the bud or flower. Even if buds and flowers do try to develop they simply fall from the plant or the reproductive origins do not properly develop. Also trace elements are essential to the feeding and development of the over 36,000 microorganisms contained in the soil, and it is these microorganisms which digest and secrete the soil nutrients to a fine enough size to be absorbed through the outer layer of the root system.  .

Fish emulsion also contains 4% celated Iron which induces Type-A green chlorophyll as well as feeding both the plants and soil microbes and actually helps to improve soil structure. Only side effect of fish emulsion is the odor which is akin to a community wet market.  

 

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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4 hours ago, JamesMusslewhite said:

Sounds like both a nutrient and trace element deficiency. Citrus trees require a steady and abundant fertilization program and here in the tropics of the Philippines we tend to have heavy rainfall with a soil of high sandy content generally lacking in sufficient organic matter caused by the heavy leching of the soils. This heavy leching removes the needed trace elements from around the root ball as well as dilute fertile applications. .

I would suggest that you first prune away any dead growth to help promote new growth. Then apply a 13-13-13 Osmicote which is a coated NPK fertilizer that is time released but remember it is time activated and can last up to 14 months so do not over fertilize. Osmicote has the needed nitrogen, phosphorous and potash but also contains trace elements. As Bosshog stated fish emulsion is your best short-term solution which is generally a NPK 4-1-1 to 5-2-2 fertilizer. NPK means nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potassium but that fermented fish stew also contains over 60 different trace elements (micro-nutrients).

Nitrogen is a component of chlorophyll and aids in growth, leaf production, flower initiation, fruit set, fruit development and fruit; Phosphorus aids in photosynthesis, enzyme activity, and in the formation and movement of sugars which is essential in the flowers and developing fruit. Potassium is essential for the formation and functions of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, chlorophyll, and maintaining a balance of salts and water within plant cells. So NPK is very important but also is needed the micro-nutrients zinc, manganese, iron, copper and boron are essential to the development of flower production and general health. This I believe may be the heart of your problem. To keep it simple, as the buds and flowers begin to form they cannot produce the required bonding agents within the physiology of the bud or flower. This imbalance or deficiency prevents the properly development, set or hold if the bud or flower. Even if buds and flowers do try to develop they simply fall from the plant or the reproductive origins do not properly develop. Also trace elements are essential to the feeding and development of the over 36,000 microorganisms contained in the soil, and it is these microorganisms which digest and secrete the soil nutrients to a fine enough size to be absorbed through the outer layer of the root system.  .

Fish emulsion also contains 4% celated Iron which induces Type-A green chlorophyll as well as feeding both the plants and soil microbes and actually helps to improve soil structure. Only side effect of fish emulsion is the odor which is akin to a community wet market.  

 

Interesting James we have the same problem - do you know the local name of the product sold in the shops so I can try and buy some of it?

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, JohnSurrey said:

Interesting James we have the same problem - do you know the local name of the product sold in the shops so I can try and buy some of it?

Osmocote is manufactured by Scotts Lawns and is marketed as 'Scotts Osmocote' and I do believe I have seen it at ACE Hardware in both Cebu and Manila. Fish Emulsion is a pretty generic product and tends to be a bit pricey by the 1gallon bottle but it dilutes in water and a Gallon goes a long ways. It is very easy to make yourself and there are quite a few websites that will give you step-by-step instructions on how to make a quality product. Nice thing is it is great on orchids, ferns, vegetables, flowers and shrubs. But being 4% iron it should not be used on colorful variegated ornamental plants as iron induces type-A chlorophyll which will turn new growth deep green, and will continue to due so until the iron in the soil is either depleted or is leached clean.   

I have none made right now, but have made batches in lots of six 55gallon plastic drums to use when fertilizing our fruit trees, banana and coconut trees. You simply take a pointy stick and punch a 5-8 inch hole in the ground in 3-4 locations around the tree or plant on the outer edges of the drip-lines and then ladle a portion of the emulsified fish in each hole. The Native Americans would punch a whole in the ground and drop into the hole a small fish and three seeds.1 corn seed, 1 bean seed and 1 gourd seed. They called the '3-Sisters'. The corn grew tall, the bean used the corn stalk to grow upwards and the gourd plant grew on the ground around the corn and beans which actually helped control pests. Today the term is multi-cropping. One small fish was sufficient to fertilize all three crops at the same time.   

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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