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Earthquake M 6.5 Northern Mindanao 10 Feb 2017

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JamesMusslewhite    12,991
8 hours ago, davehud said:

James,

Can you describe the quake? Was is a gentle shaking or rolling, or violent? Were you able to stand during it or were you forced to the ground? How would you describe it?

 

 

It really did not take long, we have been in longer events. I was sitting at the computer and my wife was sitting to the bed's edge internet texting on her phone. Being here in Surigao we often will feel the ground a jiggle and at different magnitudes. I was once riding back from Jane's Lodge after a visit to Harry Doyle on a dark drizzly night when to suddenly felt like I literally had a front tire blowout as the front suspension on the bike seemed to sluggishly sway repeatedly to the left and to the right. Once I stopped and inspected the bike I saw no faults (pardon the pun) I simply proceeded home only to be told by my nieces it had been a sizable earthquake. Once while living in the city one earthquake was violent enough for us to quickly evacuate to the street. I can only describe what for several minutes where the earth beneath our feet felt as if we were standing on top of a water bed.That one was a bit unsettling as it was an odd experience as it informs your brain that you not in control. I once saw a film where a Hollywood scout group were filming possible location for a movie project from above in an airplane. What they caught was footage on the very epicenter of a quake at the moment of the event. I can only describe the the earth below them as being not unlike a pebble being dropped in a still pond and to watch the rings of ripples ever expanding. The earth was literally rolling as the rings expanded outwards from the center, and did so repeatedly as each ring followed. See the earth under feet does not shake, rather it violently lifts and suddenly drops as the waves pass under your feet. It is this that causes the shaking sensation and causes the damage.

This quake here hit fast a violently as anything on shelves or tabletops moved or fell. Having a rather large 2-story hollow block structure so close to the back of the house hastened our exit out of the house. It hit and my wife and I simply stared at each others eyes, as we were both trying to process the severity and length of the experience. We quickly knew to take flight. The lights all went dark and the lap top provided the only light source which allowed us to stay orientated as we made our way to the front door. The city is a few kilometers inland from where we are presently living and from the photos and videos one can see the damage. This video was taken by a friend of mine and posted it to his Facebook account, so I downloaded it and uploaded it to YouTube so it could be viewed by all the members as not all members have Facebook accounts.

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Raven    537
14 hours ago, JamesMusslewhite said:

There was little to no damage to the house but there was structural damage to several columns inside the facility but no collapse. We will later have to build forms and add new rebar and re-pour an outer casing on a few columns as well as several perhaps up to six new heavy columns butted up against the outside wall. These will be up against the old columns which will strengthen the old inner columns. This should avoid a structural collapse if we are hit with another quake of this intensity. This will be far easier and cheaper than tearing down walls and 2 story columns and then rebuilding the structure.

I hope you will start a new Topic, when you start this project...like to see how you manage this and it might be useful to others.

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JamesMusslewhite    12,991

I have a few projects currently on my plate that needs to be cleared first, And as the saltwater tanks were not cracked or damaged The priority is to finish lining the saltwater tanks with ceramic tiles so I can start concentrating on the floor sumps, anchor mounts, plumbing and electrical. While that work is progressing I will start the per-sketches and diagrams for the four (1 interior and 3 exterior) columns that received the worst damage. These will require a heavy header to support and cradle the long concrete cross members.

When that repair project does starts I will be sure to start either a new thread topic or more likely simply just add it to the existing thread on the hatchery.construction. When I do I with be sure to add plenty of detailed diagrams and drawings as well as photos and videos showing each step of the interior and exterior column repairs.

Today there has been quite a few light aftershocks. One while I was typing this reply. Just makes life here more interesting...    :thumbsup: 

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sugbu777    2,185

I hope all of you who experienced this are ok, as well as your family and extended family relatives.

We had an earthquake on Guam, the day after the Mindanao quake. Very common for us to have a quake after a major quake in the Western Pacific reqion.

I grew up in Southern California, where as everyone knows, earthquakes are very common.

Worst earthquake I ever experienced was in 1993 on Guam.

http://articles.latimes.com/1993-08-09/news/mn-22018_1_tropical-storm

 

Edited by sugbu777
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AlwaysRt    530
On 2/13/2017 at 4:56 PM, JamesMusslewhite said:

I have a few projects currently on my plate that needs to be cleared first, And as the saltwater tanks were not cracked or damaged The priority is to finish lining the saltwater tanks with ceramic tiles so I can start concentrating on the floor sumps, anchor mounts, plumbing and electrical. While that work is progressing I will start the per-sketches and diagrams for the four (1 interior and 3 exterior) columns that received the worst damage. These will require a heavy header to support and cradle the long concrete cross members.

When that repair project does starts I will be sure to start either a new thread topic or more likely simply just add it to the existing thread on the hatchery.construction. When I do I with be sure to add plenty of detailed diagrams and drawings as well as photos and videos showing each step of the interior and exterior column repairs.

Today there has been quite a few light aftershocks. One while I was typing this reply. Just makes life here more interesting...    :thumbsup: 

Have you thought about filling the tanks to do a leak check to verify before continuing? It's possible for damage not to be obvious to the eye.

How did the chickens and the chicken house do?

Stay safe.

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JamesMusslewhite    12,991
3 hours ago, AlwaysRt said:

Have you thought about filling the tanks to do a leak check to verify before continuing? It's possible for damage not to be obvious to the eye.

How did the chickens and the chicken house do?

Stay safe.

   I climbed down into the tanks and thoroughly inspected both the inside surfaces and the outside surfaces. This needed to be done before I am going to allow the ceramic tiles to be laid on the top and inside surfaces. Currently I do not have the plumbing on the drain outlets nor the pump here needed to pump 96,000 liters of water needed to fill all the tanks. The visual inspection I believe was thorough enough to verify that the tanks are free of any fractures.There is a finishing layer applied on both the outside and a finishing layer with a water sealant applied on the insides which were totally free of any micro-fracturing. I had poured a heavy foundation and every second row of hollowblock had a rebar ring as well as a solid concrete cap w/ rebar ring poured on top of the tanks. I had earthquakes in mind when I was designing these tanks and I supervised all the pours and construction. I had the hollowblocks made at a ration of 25 to 1 instead of the normal 70-80 to one that most hollowblocks are made here. I even had twice the ratio of cement added in the mortar mix used.when the tank sides were being built.

   When I built the chicken coop I made it a heavy frame construction because I expected being so close to the waters edge that there was a strong probability of heavy winds. This was certainly tested when this area was hit weeks back by a heavy tropical storm that slammed into this area. The coop's heavy frame construction handled the high winds and also did equally well when the earthquake hit here. The frame actually sits on hollowblocks and did not appear to have shifted off the blocks, The earthquake did not effect the hens in the coop, but the hens have not fared so well with the wet season.

   I had a nepe roof which was sufficient to handle the rains and I had the coop place within a foot of the wall of the facility. I also had installed large roll-down tarps on the front, left and right sides of the coop. Even with these precautions being so close to the ocean water has a drawback due to the high winds, humidity and long drizzly weather. This particular breed of hens seem to have a delicate constitution and susceptible to chill and being so close to the shoreline has taken a toll on this particularly species, even though they had been kept dry during the rains. I will have to raise the cage ceiling heights an add an electrical fed into the coop so I can install a series of overhead heat-lamps. I will also have to add additional roll-down insulation layers under the rain-tarps as well, and add an insulation layers that can be laid down on top of the coop ceilings to hold the lamp generated heat inside the cage. The hen population dropped from 54 hens to 21 hens in the last 3 weeks. We still average 18 eggs a day, but before the heavy rains and winds started we were yielding 28-35 a day.

   After the rainy season ends I will build an addition coop to raise the 45-day chickens to stock our freezer, and I well be building a rabbit hutch to raise rabbits. No farm yard animal consistently produces more viable protein a year than rabbits, and rabbits have a cleaner healthier meat than that of chickens. We can eat rabbit, drop a few 45-dayers in the freezer and sell the rest along with the eggs to pay for the feeds and upkeep for the coops and hutch..    

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